Posts tagged ‘European Union’

Crisis and crisis narratives in Southwest Europe. Workshop for participants of the regional meeting of Studienstiftung des deutschen Volkes

In the past decade, societies in France, Italy, Portugal and Spain have gone through mutiple crisis. The recent pandemic further aggravates calamities that were already visible during the financial and Eurozone crisis: social inequalities, dysfunctions in national systems of social security and health provision, political instability and non-sustainable economies. At the same time, the Covid-19 pandemic markes a shift in policies of crisis management: on both national and European levels, policy-makers have departed from austerity and agreed on stimulus programmes, instead. This workshop explores reasons for this policy shift and the role, crisis narratives play in making that shift more or less possible.

Just out: Kutter & Masson (2022) ‘Researching institutions after the discursive turn’

This chapter, published in The SAGE Handbook of Qualitative Research Design edited by Uwe Flick, explores the contribution that qualitative research can make to the investigation of institutions in the current setting. We claim that institution research can benefit from a combination of discourse analysis with Foucauldian governmentality studies and Bourdieusian field analysis. We first introduce the subjects and theoretical traditions of institution research so that scholars interested in the subject can navigate the field. Using the examples of the governmentality of EU agricultural policy and the discourse field of EU multilateral negotiation, we then demonstrate how a qualitative enquiry into institutions can be designed, conducted and reflected upon after the discursive turn.

Exercise in complexity and contingency: the example of the MES-Viadrina snap-shot simulation of EU legislation on asylum and migration

This paper, presented by Amelie Kutter at the DVPW Congress 2021, suggests that a neglected, but promising, potential of EU simulations is their function as exercises in complexity and contingency. If designed appropriately, simulation games not only reveal the complexity and contingency of EU politics (cognitive learning), but also the complexity and contingency of thinking about EU politics (cognitive-reflexive learning). Drawing on the example of a snap-shot simulation of the first reading of the EU’s New Pact on Asylum and Migration that was carried out as part of the lecture class ‘Introduction to the politics of the European Union’ at the MA European Studies unit of European University Viadrina, I will show such learning objective can be fostered in simulation game design.

Kutter, A. (2020) Construction of the Eurozone crisis: re- and depoliticising European economic integration

(Deutsch) The Eurozone crisis is among recent developments that upset the European Union (EU) most profoundly and sparked unprecedented contestation. This article adopts a discursive notion of politicisation and the frame of Discursive Political Studies to investigate whether that moment of contestation re-politicised EU economic governance in substantive terms. It argues that, while emerging counter-narratives of crisis projected alternative scenarios of economic integration and established a practice of constructive EU critique, they were co-opted by the dominant mass-mediated story of a public debt crisis.

Research collaboration: Advancing multiscalar social citizenship in Europe (2020…)

Recent  crises  have  revealed  that  access  to  social  rights, such as social security, short time work, housing, or health care is essential for the resilience of economies to external shocks, but also for sustaining social cohesion, trust and belonging in European societies. This collaborative project investigates the limits and potentials of transnational social citizenship in Europe. The objective is to map sources of social citizenship that have established at the EU’s different scales in law, policy, regulation, social work, and perceptions and discourses of social citizenship, and that might form part of a set of rights enforcible not only for EU migrants, but for those marginalised within their societies, too.